Tag Archives: thirsty

Why Drinking Water is Important

5 Major Functions that Water Aids in

  • In the blood, water transports oxygen, glucose, and fats to working muscles and carries away metabolic by-products such as carbon dioxide and lactic acid.
  • Water helps urine eliminate metabolic waste products.
  • Water aids saliva and gastric secretions, which helps digest food.
  • It lubricates joints and cushions organs throughout the body.
  • In sweat, it dissipates heat through the skin.

Did you know that your body will retain less water if intake is sufficient?

How can water help weight loss?

  • When water takes place of sugary beverages or juice, it results in a reduction of total calorie intake.
  • Drinking a glass of water before meals and snacks can help an individual feel full and consume fewer calories.
  • Maintaining sufficient amounts of water can help the body to function more efficiently, especially in the areas of maintaining ideal body temperature during exercise and increasing fat utilization.
  • Its common to mistake thirst for hunger. Click here for my recent post: are you hungry or thirsty
  • Drinking water helps decrease the desire for other sugary, high calorie drinks.

What type of Water is Best?

Water that does not contain sugar or artificial sweeteners is best. Excessive consumption of artificial sweeteners can stimulate hunger. When that happens, it can derail your health goals and eating plans as a result.

How Much Water is Enough?

Making changes gradually can help reduce the daunting affects and help contribute to permanent success. Start making small increases. See what works for you. A doctor or registered dietitian can help you determine the amount of water that is right for you. I have included a quote from the Mayo Clinic’s website below as a reference.

How much water do you need?

Every day you lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. For your body to function properly, you must replenish its water supply by consuming beverages and foods that contain water.
So how much fluid does the average, healthy adult living in a temperate climate need? The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine determined that an adequate daily fluid intake is:

About 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of fluids for men
About 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) of fluids a day for women
These recommendations cover fluids from water, other beverages and food. About 20 percent of daily fluid intake usually comes from food and the rest from drinks.
What about the advice to drink 8 glasses a day?

You’ve probably heard the advice, “Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day.” That’s easy to remember, and it’s a reasonable goal.
Most healthy people can stay hydrated by drinking water and other fluids whenever they feel thirsty. For some people, fewer than eight glasses a day might be enough. But other people might need more.

Factors that influence water needs

You might need to modify your total fluid intake based on several factors:
Exercise. If you do any activity that makes you sweat, you need to drink extra water to cover the fluid loss. It’s important to drink water before, during and after a workout. If exercise is intense and lasts more than an hour, a sports drink can replace minerals in your blood (electrolytes) lost through sweat.
Environment. Hot or humid weather can make you sweat and requires additional fluid intake. Dehydration also can occur at high altitudes.
Overall health. Your body loses fluids when you have a fever, vomiting or diarrhea. Drink more water or follow a doctor’s recommendation to drink oral rehydration solutions. Other conditions that might require increased fluid intake include bladder infections and urinary tract stones.
Pregnancy or breast-feeding. Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding need additional fluids to stay hydrated. The Office on Women’s Health recommends that pregnant women drink about 10 cups (2.4 liters) of fluids daily and women who breast-feed consume about 13 cups (3.1 liters) of fluids a day.

www.Mayoclinic.org

Thanks for taking the time to read my blog,

Catherine Bares


 

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Are you thirsty or hungry? You may be thirsty.

Mixed signals

Years ago, I discovered that when I feel cravings for food come over me it was really my body dehydrating and was sending me mixed signals.  I went looking for an article that can help explain the process and found one on www.livestrong.com

“Thirst Occurs when your body needs water.  When you do not drink enough water, your body receives mixed signals of hunger.  Dehydration causes you to believe you need to eat when you really need liquid intake.  Sometimes you eat food out of boredom.  Keeping track of what you drink and eat will help stop overeating.  It will also clue in to how much you drink a day, and what your liquid needs are.”

“Dehydration Symptoms”
“Dehydration symptoms include constipation, thirst, dry skin, a sluggish feeling, dizziness, dry eyes and decreased urine output.  Drinking eight 8 oz. glasses of water a day will help prevent dehydration.  If you have these symptoms, seek medical help.  Symptoms of diabetes include dehydration.”
“Feeling Tired”
“If you do not get enough to drink on a daily basis, you will feel tired.  You will feel hungry because your body thinks it needs food for energy.  This sense of feeling tired relates to your body not taking in enough fluids, which help your body function better.  Your body’s organs need water just as a car’s engine needs fuel to run efficiently.”

-LiveStrong.com

Seek Medical/Nutritionist advice

I am not a nutritionist, I am sharing information that I think helps me feel better.  When something feels off in my body, I try to listen and seek advice on how to overcome it. Always seek medical advice when you experience changes in your health.

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