Tag Archives: water

Why Drinking Water is Important

5 Major Functions that Water Aids in

  • In the blood, water transports oxygen, glucose, and fats to working muscles and carries away metabolic by-products such as carbon dioxide and lactic acid.
  • Water helps urine eliminate metabolic waste products.
  • Water aids saliva and gastric secretions, which helps digest food.
  • It lubricates joints and cushions organs throughout the body.
  • In sweat, it dissipates heat through the skin.

Did you know that your body will retain less water if intake is sufficient?

How can water help weight loss?

  • When water takes place of sugary beverages or juice, it results in a reduction of total calorie intake.
  • Drinking a glass of water before meals and snacks can help an individual feel full and consume fewer calories.
  • Maintaining sufficient amounts of water can help the body to function more efficiently, especially in the areas of maintaining ideal body temperature during exercise and increasing fat utilization.
  • Its common to mistake thirst for hunger. Click here for my recent post: are you hungry or thirsty
  • Drinking water helps decrease the desire for other sugary, high calorie drinks.

What type of Water is Best?

Water that does not contain sugar or artificial sweeteners is best. Excessive consumption of artificial sweeteners can stimulate hunger. When that happens, it can derail your health goals and eating plans as a result.

How Much Water is Enough?

Making changes gradually can help reduce the daunting affects and help contribute to permanent success. Start making small increases. See what works for you. A doctor or registered dietitian can help you determine the amount of water that is right for you. I have included a quote from the Mayo Clinic’s website below as a reference.

How much water do you need?

Every day you lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. For your body to function properly, you must replenish its water supply by consuming beverages and foods that contain water.
So how much fluid does the average, healthy adult living in a temperate climate need? The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine determined that an adequate daily fluid intake is:

About 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of fluids for men
About 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) of fluids a day for women
These recommendations cover fluids from water, other beverages and food. About 20 percent of daily fluid intake usually comes from food and the rest from drinks.
What about the advice to drink 8 glasses a day?

You’ve probably heard the advice, “Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day.” That’s easy to remember, and it’s a reasonable goal.
Most healthy people can stay hydrated by drinking water and other fluids whenever they feel thirsty. For some people, fewer than eight glasses a day might be enough. But other people might need more.

Factors that influence water needs

You might need to modify your total fluid intake based on several factors:
Exercise. If you do any activity that makes you sweat, you need to drink extra water to cover the fluid loss. It’s important to drink water before, during and after a workout. If exercise is intense and lasts more than an hour, a sports drink can replace minerals in your blood (electrolytes) lost through sweat.
Environment. Hot or humid weather can make you sweat and requires additional fluid intake. Dehydration also can occur at high altitudes.
Overall health. Your body loses fluids when you have a fever, vomiting or diarrhea. Drink more water or follow a doctor’s recommendation to drink oral rehydration solutions. Other conditions that might require increased fluid intake include bladder infections and urinary tract stones.
Pregnancy or breast-feeding. Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding need additional fluids to stay hydrated. The Office on Women’s Health recommends that pregnant women drink about 10 cups (2.4 liters) of fluids daily and women who breast-feed consume about 13 cups (3.1 liters) of fluids a day.

www.Mayoclinic.org

Thanks for taking the time to read my blog,

Catherine Bares


 

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Are you thirsty or hungry? You may be thirsty.

Mixed signals

Years ago, I discovered that when I feel cravings for food come over me it was really my body dehydrating and was sending me mixed signals.  I went looking for an article that can help explain the process and found one on www.livestrong.com

“Thirst Occurs when your body needs water.  When you do not drink enough water, your body receives mixed signals of hunger.  Dehydration causes you to believe you need to eat when you really need liquid intake.  Sometimes you eat food out of boredom.  Keeping track of what you drink and eat will help stop overeating.  It will also clue in to how much you drink a day, and what your liquid needs are.”

“Dehydration Symptoms”
“Dehydration symptoms include constipation, thirst, dry skin, a sluggish feeling, dizziness, dry eyes and decreased urine output.  Drinking eight 8 oz. glasses of water a day will help prevent dehydration.  If you have these symptoms, seek medical help.  Symptoms of diabetes include dehydration.”
“Feeling Tired”
“If you do not get enough to drink on a daily basis, you will feel tired.  You will feel hungry because your body thinks it needs food for energy.  This sense of feeling tired relates to your body not taking in enough fluids, which help your body function better.  Your body’s organs need water just as a car’s engine needs fuel to run efficiently.”

-LiveStrong.com

Seek Medical/Nutritionist advice

I am not a nutritionist, I am sharing information that I think helps me feel better.  When something feels off in my body, I try to listen and seek advice on how to overcome it. Always seek medical advice when you experience changes in your health.

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Use Food instead of Energy Drinks

I am not a nutritionist; you should always discuss your eating habits with a doctor or nutritionist before making changes to your day to day eating habits.  The information provided below was found on line.  Please click the link to the article to see the story in its entirety along with reference notes.

I have read some stories how people are being hospitalized from overdoing energy drinks. We should do some research on how to properly fuel up to increase energy rather than take the easy, convenient road to energy.  Lets look at the foods that can give you an energy boost.  I came across a Newsletter on line:  “27 Foods that can give you more energy.” (click the link to read the article in its entirety.)

  1. Bananas

According to the article, “Bananas may be the best foods for energy. They are an excellent source of carbohydrates, potassium and vitamin B6, all of which can help boost energy levels in your body.”

2. Fatty Fish

“Fatty fish like salmon and tuna are good sources of protein, fatty acids and B vitamins, making them great foods to include in your diet.”

3. Brown Rice

“Brown rice is a very nutritious food. Unlike white rice, it is less processed and retains more nutritional value in the form of fiber, vitamins and minerals.”

4. Sweet Potatoes

“…sweet potatoes are a nutritious source of energy for those looking for an extra boost.”  I like to eat  my sweet potato with cinnamon and cayenne pepper.  Yummy!

5. Coffee

“Coffee might be the first food you’d think to consume when you’re looking for a boost of energy.”

6. Eggs

“Packed in protein..”

7. Apples

“Due to their rich content of natural sugars and fiber, apples can provide a slow and sustained energy release.”

8. Water

“Water is essential for life.  ……and is involved in many cellular functions, including energy production.”

9. Dark Chocolate

“The antioxidants in cocoa have been shown to have many health benefits, such as increasing blood flow throughout the body.”

10. Yerba Mate’

“Yerba Mate’ contains antioxidants and caffeine. ….”

11. Goji Berries

“Besides being packed with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, this fruit is known to be a good source of fiber.”

12.  Quinoa

“Quinoa is a seed popular for its high protein content.”

13. Oatmeal

“Oatmeal is a whole-grain cereal that could provide you with long-lasting energy.”

14. Yogurt

“Yogurt is an excellent snack to fuel up your day.”

15.  Hummus

“Chickpeas in hummus are a good source of complex carbs and fiber that the body uses for steady energy.”

16. Edamame

“Edamame can be an easy satisfying pick-me-up snack.”  I am not trying to get into a technical debate on Soy products; it made the list so I kept it in the blog.  Be responsible and research the pros and cons on ingesting soy products and how that affects the human body.

17.  Lentils

“…..Lentils are a good source of nutrients and help boost energy levels.”

18. Avocados

“…they’re rich in healthy fats and fiber.”

19. Oranges

“Oranges are famous for their high vitamin C content.  One orange can provide as much as 106% of the RDI for Vitamin C.” “Additionally, oranges contain antioxidant compounds that can provide protection from oxidative stress.”

20. Strawberries

“Strawberries are another good energy-boosting fruit.” “….Besides helping fight inflammation in the body, the antioxidants in strawberries may help fight fatigue and give you energy.”

21. Seeds

“Seeds, such as chia, flax seeds and pumpkin seeds, could also increase your energy levels.” “These seeds are generally high in plant-based omega-3 fatty acids.  Low levels of Omega-3 fatty acids have been linked to increased inflammation and fatigue.”

22.  Beans

“….Beans are digested slowly, which helps maintain stable blood sugar levels and gives you steady energy.  Additionally, beans contain antioxidants that can help fight inflammation and promote energy.”

23. Green Tea

“…It has a high concentration of powerful antioxidants that can help prevent oxidative stress and inflammation.”

24. Nuts

“…Most nuts like almonds, walnuts and cashews are known for their high calories and abundance of proteins, carbs and healthy fats.  These nutrients can provide you with a slower release of energy during the day.”

25. Popcorn

“..It’s high in carbs and fiber, which can make it very satisfying and a good option for an energy-boosting snack.”  I like to make popcorn the old fashioned way, so I can control what goes in it.

26. Leafy Green Vegetables

“Leafy green vegetables, such as spinach and kale, are excellent sources of nutrients that promote energy.  They are high in iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium and vitamins A, C, E and K.  Additionally they are packed with folic acid, fiber and antioxidants that provide health benefits.”  Be mindful how Vitamin K, magnesium and potassium affect certain health conditions.

27. Beets

“…Studies have shown that beetroot may be able to improve blood flow due to its antioxidant content and naturally occurring nitrates.”

I will make an effort this week to steer away from processed foods and eat more whole, natural foods.  I always feel better when I follow natural food, eating habits.  Hope you enjoyed the information and again, always do the research and ask for medical advice if you have certain conditions that will be irritated by foods.Facebooklinkedinyoutubeinstagramby feather
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#Did You Know-Water

Did you know that your body may be in need of water when you are craving food?  The need for water and hydration may be disguised as a craving for food, especially sweets.  Next time you feel a snack attack coming on try drinking a glass of water and wait a few minutes.  It may just crush it.

6 signs & symptoms of dehydration.  Check out #5.

Catherine Bares

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