Category Archives: Paleo

#Did You Know-Water

Did you know that your body may be in need of water when you are craving food?  The need for water and hydration may be disguised as a craving for food, especially sweets.  Next time you feel a snack attack coming on try drinking a glass of water and wait a few minutes.  It may just crush it.

6 signs & symptoms of dehydration.  Check out #5.

Catherine Bares

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#Another food tip-Tomatoes

Here’s another tip from Tim Skwiat, Head Nutrition Coach, BioTrust Nutrition:

“You may have heard that most fruits and veggies are better consumed raw instead of cooked, as cooking can reduce their vitamin and mineral content.  While this is true in many cases, it’s the exact opposite with tomatoes.  You see, tomatoes are rich in lycopene, a phytonutrient with many positive health benefits.  Unlike other veggies, cooking actually increases concentrations of lycopene in tomatoes, so enjoy tomato sauce, roasted tomatoes, and other cooked dishes with tomatoes more often!”

Catherine Bares

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#Eating Pre Sliced Strawberries

According to Tim Skwiat,  Head Nutrition Coach at BioTrust Nutrition:

“Did you know that it’s not just the foods you eat, but actually the way you EAT them that matters when it comes to maximum fat-burning?”

“For example, if you are eating pre-sliced strawberries, the fat-burning vitamin content of these sweet treats can be compromised due to prolonged exposure to oxygen.  Instead, when eating strawberries, it’s best to eat them whole (who doesn’t love biting into a juicy strawberry?), or at least wait until you are ready to eat to slice and dice them up.  One thing you DON’T want to do is slice them and then store them, consuming them over time, as this will surely reduce the fat-burning power of the great strawberry.”

Catherine Bares

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#Did you Know Cilantro is Packed with

Did you know that Cilantro is packed with phytonutrients and antioxidants?  According to Issue #22 of Inspire Health, “it is a great source of dietary fiber, iron, magnesium and manganese.  Cilantro is rich in antioxidants that are effective at fighting free radicals. ”

  • Parsley: “high in Vitamin C and A”
  • Oregano and Thyme: “Fiber dense”
  • Basil: “Vitamin A”
  • Chives: “Folic Acid”

When deciding on fresh or dried herbs: “using fresh spring herbs rather than dried or processed seasonings is a simple way to add nutrient density to daily meals.” “Consumption of fresh spring herbs has health benefits far beyond simply adding flavor to food.”

Catherine Bares

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Cooking Venison

Wow, that smells bad

The first time I cooked venison I swore I would never cook it again.  It smelled bad and tasted terrible.  But, living with a family of hunters and having a freezer full of venison, I decided to investigate techniques to prepare the meat before cooking. As a result, venison is my preferred meat.

First, in order to remove the wild game taste, the meat should be drained of blood.  How do you do that? I have found 2 effective ways:

  1. For a quick turn around: cover defrosted meat with milk, seal the container, and place it in the refrigerator overnight.  Drain the milk that will now look pink, rinse with water, and cook as desired.
  2. Let the meat sit in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days (no milk needed). Drain the blood, rinse the meat with water, and cook as desired. (If meat is frozen it can sit in the refrigerator 3 to 4 days.  If meat is not frozen reduce sit time to 2 days.)

Take the Chill off

Raw meat will cook more evenly at room temperature, especially thicker cuts. In fact, taking the chill off your roasts, chops and even fish fillets before cooking will produce juicier, more evenly cooked meat. You will find that more blood will come out when you take the chill out (Up to 30 minutes).  Once you drain off the excess blood, cook it as desired. You should always take safety precautions when taking the chill off meat.

  • Never refrigerate room temperature meat without cooking it first.  Once it is out it should be cooked. Be sure to cook raw meat within 30 minutes of taking out of the refrigerator. If the room is 85 to 90 degrees, cook the meat immediately after taking it out of the refrigerator.
  • Never thaw frozen meat at room temperature. It should always come from the freezer to the refrigerator for the thawing process.
  • Always keep meat covered.
  • Wash any cookware and/or cooking utensils with hot soapy water after using it with raw meat.
  • Never use the same utensils that touched raw meat on other food before washing them.
  •  Always wipe counter-tops down with antibacterial cleaners if raw meat or blood touches it.
    • Do the research on raw meat safety. I am not an expert in the matter.

One of my favorite venison recipes from Tony Chachere’s Cajun Country Cookbook. Venison Parmesan 

Catherine Bares

 

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Did you Know? Avocados

According to Mark Ettinger, M.D., of BioTrust Nutrition:

 “Avocados are one of the best flab-fighting fats, but it’s unlikely that you’ll eat an entire avocado in one sitting.  So how do you keep that leftover avocado from turning brown?”

“Well, first let’s talk about why avocados turn brown.  Like apples or potatoes, they oxidize when exposed to air.  Once you cut into an avocado, you’ll never be able to completely stop the oxidation process, but you can dramatically slow it with a few quick tips and tricks:”

1. “Cut the avocado with a ceramic or plastic knife.  Metal actually accelerates the oxidation process.”

2. “Try lemon or lime juice. Citric acid is a powerful antioxidant; rub a little juice around the exposed flesh and you’ll significantly delay the browning effect.”

3. “No lemon or lime? Use oil. Oil is another great buffer to oxygen. Use in place of lemon or lime juice when you don’t have any handy.”

4. “Store as air-tight as possible. Again, avocados turn brown due to oxidation and exposure to air, so storing in an air-tight container only makes sense.”

5. “Water. Huh? That’s right! This one works exceptionally well for guacamole. Place your leftover guac in a plastic container and press down to remove any air pockets. Add a half inch of water on top and seal with an air-tight lid. The water creates a barrier between the avocado and the air, keeping your guacamole fresh and 100% green for 24 hours or more!  When ready to eat some more, just drain the excess water and enjoy.  Works like a charm!”

Catherine Bares

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Natural Sources of Omega 3

Did you know that there are other food sources besides fish that contain Omega 3’s?

  • Walnuts
  • Pecans
  • Poppy Seeds
  • Pistachio Nuts
  • Chia Seeds
  • Flax Seed oil
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Some Leafy Green (Fresh Spinach)
  • Egg Yolks
  • Some Vegetable oils

Catherine Bares


 

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